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Search Results 150 to 199 of about 844 (some duplicates have been removed)
% and brutal in any environment and especially when other budgets hasn't been slashed as much, and understanding it might upset the apple cart so to speak, but i don't think we can be afraid of that in g we have to innovate. to some degree and maybe your department faces a challenge and labeled innovation capital of the world, however you want to label it and in the center of technology globally and i think we are expected to innovate. so what are some of the things that have to happen? what environments do you have to see -- let's say it's a centralization issue. what are issues that have to take place to have that dialogue happening? to me as i read through the report and i don't know about you president chiu, there seems to be an issue here. and progress is being made and that is great but is it fast enough? when i tell people i am on lotus notes for email it's a round laughter all along and what needs to take place. >> let me say two things about the conversation and let me put it out there how i perceive the comments and the reports and supervisor your comments. number
as well as well as working on parks. so in the environment i need to tell everyone, that muni is a priority, without muni the city will come to a stand still and it is not working properly right now. other cities can do transit systems even with snow and terrible weather, and san francisco can't. we need to fix it. i've worked in the green jobs area. i have helped push through go solar sf, which has created hundreds of jobs in san francisco and i need to do more of that for the citizens of san francisco. i will close with the idea that san francisco and district five in particular need a hard-working supervisor who has a stable background and a proven track record of making hard decision and getting things done. and i'm that person. >> hi, my name is thea starby and i am asking you to make me your next district five supervisor. as a long time neighborhood activist, i am able to speak and more importantly listen to people from all walks of life and all, professions. >> i have gotten these groups to talk and listen to each other. i have got involved in politics after 2007 double
. it is people like me are getting resumes every day in this difficult economic environment. from high class standing people. 800 sats, they are looking for jobs. what you have to do is find a hook on your resume and show a high sense of community service. when i interview people, basically, the desire and commitment to be the best, a strong work ethic. here i am introducing a legend. you know, the legends do something different. you know, these are some of the characteristics. you can get help from the university. if numbers don't speak to you, in other words, ben graham wrote a book called the intelligent investor in 1954. in the bookie prophesies that analysts evaluate management twice in the process. once through the numbers. when you look at a company, the company is growing and the return investment is widespread and profit margins and whatever -- the return to capital and whatever -- those are resulting from the efforts imagine. so you want to look at the financials. also, you want to look at the face-to-face and understand the business properly. if you don't like working with numbers
was someone who was actually crit tal to maintaining her health. but in a work environment, you need to make sure that the rules are clear. so that legislation, tried to create rules in a work environment for some information and they had protection and they could have breaks and they could have all of the protections that we have when we go to work. >> i think this we are a country that is founded on immigrants and i think that actually my ancestors, many people in the audience have been and they came from around the world and across the world. started in new lifes themselves. so, i just support completely the important role that immigrants have and i think that clearly, that there should be a path to citizenship and that there should be a great respect in many ways for all of the things that they do. >> state proposition, 35, asks if the definition of human trafficking should be expanded and the penalties for the traffickers be increased and be registered for sex offenders and training be provided for law enforcement officers. i am curious, what is your position on this? >> i support that.
stable. and we went straight to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the
in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in
, but it's what we need. professionally i'm a cartographer. san francisco department and the environment, law firms, national park service and many more. i'm a father, a husband, a homeowner. our daughter is a fifth generation san franciscan. my lifelong record of volunteerism is one major way i stand out among the other candidates. while living in the dorms at san francisco state i started and ran the recycling program which reaches over 5,000 campus residents. after moving off campus i delivered thousands of meals for project open hand and tutored literacy to adults. enteredctionv a -- supervisor elsbernd appointed me, i worked with sfpd, play guitar, give blood several times a year, and going over this list, hoping to demonstrate to you my core belief in civic duty and community involvement. i also believe that the next step in my ability to contribute is to help govern as supervisor. now just a few of the many important issues. we are in economic straits and need to be conservative with our finances now and for the future. pension, salary and benefit reform has come a long way, but w
environment still? > > i don't believe so. long- term bonds, most of the gains that we have seen in there have been capital gains. we have to understand that when interest rates fall - and we're talking long-term interest rates - fall, long-term bonds will rise in value. but the opposite will also occur. so we're in an environment where long-term interest rates are, if they're not at record lows as we speak, they're pretty close to record lows, and you have central banks around the world - in the u.s. as well as other places - trying to reflate, trying to cause growth to happen. and when growth arises, interest rates rise. so you're betting against some of the most powerful central banks in the world by buying long-term bonds. > > what are you recommending to clients? > > if the client wishes to stay with bonds, then you move to the shorter end, that is the one-to-five-year area. they still could be affected to some degree if interest rates rise. and again, this would be long- term interest rates rising. but they certainly wouldn't be hurt as much as long-term bonds. there was a study i saw re
to control our preferences. we are victims of our environments growing up. we are victims of our context that we live in and, therefore, we all, you know, are not "responsible for that behavior and therefore should be mitigating." when you look at the testimony that comes in, whether it's from a mother or from neighbors or from teachers that are talking about really mitigating circumstances, they are the rotten social background kind of arguments, the abuse and the suffering that that individual experienced and those things show up in the brain. the brain is also a sponge. the brain isn't simply created by genetics and it's very much shaped by environment. and so my mentor john monaghan likened the problem of predicting violent people to predicting violent storms. when you think of meteorology, you think of the difficulty of classifying a hurricane and tracking a hurricane, making judgments about such complex behavior that has sort of chaotic premises underlying it, you're going to make lots of mistakes. you're going to make lots of mistakes in both directions. sometimes you're going to
that meander we do under a canopy of 0, redwood, pine, and eucalyptus. chill out and this environment and you might see butterflies, and dandelions. blue jays fly between the eucalyptus. it is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. six, 24, or 71 bus. we have conquered the steps we walked the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view the park has to offer. this is the place to take someone special and enjoyed a beautiful look out. " come to corona heights, located in the heart of this district. it offers a spectacular view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. the park is one of the best kept secrets. unlike twin peaks, it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. hop on a 37 bus to get there with that any parking worries. locals can bring their dogs to run with other dogs. there is also grass for small dogs. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place for the city to provide these kind of parks. the dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice the wildflowers on the grassland. and keep your head on the lookout for hawks and
-tech environment in which people could provide input. so, one of the themes of western soma, in every meeting in every town hall was always the theme of the public is always welcome. and, so, what i'd like to do in some of these slides is to talk about the very deep meaningful commitment to community involvement. this is a simple model that talks about the levels of community. and you can see down at the bottom is that people could be basically informed. but at the very top, the role for citizen power really rests in having citizens either have control, have power such as be able to provide input to direct the conversations and to be truly a partnership. and, so, that was the intent of the level of community input. this statement about being a citizen planner actually came from what we were trying to do in the second town hall. this is the handout from the second town hall that everybody got, and it says that one of the things that we wanted to do is to create citizens planners. a citizen planner is a resident, small business owners, community activists and public officials trained in the bas
security and begin to undo the damage that our current water system does to the environment. the plan would then be brought back to the voters in 2016 for their aprafl or disapproval so it's placing the city on a trajectory we're not currently on. we don't recycle any water, we've abandoned most ground water since hetch hetchy became available and we've done real damage to the tuolome river and we begin it's time to get in line with the city's values. it's a plan the voters ultimately get to approve. >> i disagree. i think proposition f is about one thing and one thing only, about forcing the city to spend $8 million dollars to conduct a plan that would require us to drain hetch hetchy reservoir at a cost of anywhere between 3 and 10 billion dollars that gets translated to our rate payers at anywhere between $2,000 and $2700 per year per rate payer. this is a proposal largely hoisted upon san franciscoans by outsiders. not one san francisco organization supports this measure. every group from san francisco tomorrow to the republican party across the political spectrum opposes us
for over 400 years. it is a very urban environment. it is not like some of the areas for long island and recent histories with houses way out onto beach territory. some of them situated. it is not the kind of island environment where you think of yourselves as having ocean on the sides and i was born and raised here on staten island and so were my mom and dad. staten island has had a feeling of what you had said. the complete opposite. there was never a threat. people never thought that there would be problems with the tides. here on staten island. and i think that is what caught a lot of people off guard here on staten island was that we never thought something like this could happen. we do have many beautiful houses and beautiful community that is are on the coast lines of our island. and we never thought there would be a problem like this. and i think that caught a lot of people off guard. >> michael cusik thank you very much for joining us tonight. tomorrow night, msnbc will host a concert and telethon to raise money for the american red cross relief efforts. you can see it right
rammed city, the free farm stand, to growing home community garden as well as garden for the environment, raise the roof, the little city garden, [speaker not understood], please touch community garden, eco sf school farm at the school of the arts, the veggie table at third and pa lou, the treasure island [speaker not understood], the farm that recently got together at the has valley playground and hayes valley farm. we recognize that successful communities are a part of a sustainable environment. we recognize our responsibility to all the relationships that make -- and we will make decisions with all of these thoughts in mind as our integral communities include our volunteers, our supporters, our partners, and the folks who live right around us. >> i'm sorry, but the other one gets two minutes. so, we may call you back up afterwards to have you finish your statement. but we have to sort of -- >>> i want to thank the general opportunity for community input, for community participation and for neighborhood feedback. >> we're with you completely. we'll call you back up if you need to finis
and i think what you are probably saying is, you know, maybe we should consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhap
of actual demonstration of that in a more austere environment and we tried to fit that in, how does it fit in with what we're doing in san francisco and the bay area with medical planning. so yesterday we had an opportunity to go out and see a shock trauma platoon set up on ocean beach, had them running demonstrations and asking questions of the doctors and nurses there. we also saw a landing craft on the beach. yes, it can bring a tractor, it can bring personnel, it can also evacuate patients. it can also bring resources that we otherwise wouldn't be able to get into the city. general spies has said it many times, they have the ability to go around, over, i think through was one of those as well, any of the obstacles we find in our way. that's a resource we in san francisco really have to capitalize on. as i look at all these things, frankly i just was talking to somebody this morning, this is like the toy store of resources for me. when you sit on this ship, you look around, yes, it's a ship, it carries helicopters. it is so much more than that. it's a platform that does so many th
to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. >> this week on "to the contrary" president obama regains solid support among women voters just before the election. >> hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news a socl trends from diverse perspectives. up first, the last-minute scuffle for voters: the ground game. early voting. cell phone polls and women voters dominated the final days of the presidential race. a late week "new york times" poll showed the gender gap re-emerge knowledge in president obama's favor. 52% of women and 44% of men support obama. while the g.o.p.'s mitt romney has 44% of women and1% of men in his corner. women voters in battleground states are the coveted demographic according to two campaign experts. >> i think if you look at the president has done with the economy, it is very far reaching, just across the country women have access to ca
of the impact of nightlife activity and maintaining safe environments. to facilitate the implementation of effective based approaches and nightlife approaches. to have knowledge how these can be managed effectively and network and working on an international and national level so we have a number of different themes. there is certainly an alcohol on alcohol and tobacco and other drugs and how they impact the viernlt. and health and safety standards, emerging trends in club culture, international nightlife tourism, policy and policing and public safety and nightlife associated with nightlife venues, sexual health and preventing violence in these settings and these are a number of themes the commission deals with on a regular basis and as a franciscan i think san francisco has a fair amount to say how we manage it and bodies like the entertainment commission are ways to engage the nightlife and entertainment communities in productive ways and improve public health and public safety, so you have the fliers that has the dates. it's at the mark hopkins hotel and it's going to start on may
you about the big step one city took to help the environment. brandon reports that more and more communities are now taking up the cause. >> they stuff our landfills, tangle in our trees, and they kill sea birds and mammals. plastic bags -- ever year, we use and throw away millions of them. >> plastic bags are a huge litter problem throughout the world. >> we interviewed mr. bloomenfeld back in 2007 when san francisco became the first city in the u.s. to ban plastic bags. large stores were not allowed to offer them to customers. the ban was a success. so the city then voted to expand it to every store in town. now communities all across the country are hopping on the "ban" wagon. the day after rye, new york, passed its law against plastic bags, teens were handing out green alternatives. >> there are no more plastic bags going to be offered in stores, so we're helping people out by giving them reusable bags. >> reusable bags are considered the best alternative... >> wonderful. >> ...because even paper bags are bad for the environment. although they can be recycled, they still use
. that is destruction interference. the eye gonna see nothing. you're not gonna see this in your local environment. what you will see in your local environment is white light from the sun. the sunlight coming down and hitting the gasoline on a rainy day. you've all noticed that. you notice that? it's gotta be a rainy day that the gasoline gives you the color. why? 'cause the gasoline gotta float on water to give you two surfaces to make reflection from, yeah? okay? now, when white light hits for this particular thickness, the blue is gone. you check with your neighbor and see if your neighbor knows. if the blue is gone from the white reflecting, what color is the eye gonna see? go. what's it gonna be, gang? - green. - something. how many say a yellow or an orange or something like that? yeah, yeah the complementary color of that shade of blue, yeah? we talked about this. we talked about the blue sky, remember? the blue sky scatters off blue. so given enough sky for the light to get through by the time light gets to you and all the blue is scattered, what do you get left, gang? you get the complementary
. there are enough companies that have tripped that this is not just a specific company environment. as you hinted, geography does matter. companies primarily domestic, u.s. oriented tend to be having better earnings reports than those that have significant businesses outside of the u.s. >> here we are a few days away from the presidential election. what impact do you expect the election to have on the economy and the markets? what would a romney presidency mean versus an obama re-election? >> i think we have to start by saying that it is so close that uncertainty is killing everyone. i have read articles about gee what happens if we don't know the next morning. it will mean neither candidate has a mandate. we need more compromise and we will have more loggerheads and more polarization. i wish it could be different. >> that's the issue. we haven't seen the two sides get together. they are unable to compromise. we have the fiscal cliff looming. why would it be better in terms of compromising and getting things done? >> so the optimist in me says, okay if it is mitt romney he was a republican govern
in a crisis environment that they will not necessarily accept when it is going well. ecowas your point that no one has been yelling fire -- that goes to your point that no one has been yelling fire. is an impetus to get things done. i am co-chairman of the campaign to fix the debt. i do not know how many of you or your cdo's were present when my cochair and i spoke to the roundtable in washington. bob zelnick is a member of our board. he said, the u.s. is one debt deal away from semenya its place as the world of leading economic power for the next -- from cementing its place as the world, leading economic power for the next 25 years. and he is right to i think we can do it. i think senator toomey has been a leader on this issue. if he were convinced, and convincing him is never easy, but if he were convinced, he would get things done. it may not be 100% of what what what, -- if i could play one thing in the senate cloakrooms, it would be the rolling stones song "you can't always get what you want." >> it is fairly easy at one level because you have budget involved. you can say that the
way for our economy, for our environment and also to make sure that people are safe on their jobs. >> we need to get away from our reliance on foreign energy. we are taking some good steps in that direction. we have some great examples right here in peoria. with the ag lab. they are researching something that has great potential. as higher oil content than soy beans. it can be planted in the off- season. and has great potential to be used as an alternative biofuel. within the 17th congressional district, we have examples of solar farms. we have examples of wind farms. and did a favor of keeping the wind farm subsidy. that is currently being fought by the republican presidential nominee. i am at a favor of that. we have a district that can be a leader in the united states for helping us come up with alternative energy sources and get away from the rely on foreign tule. -- the reliance on foreign fuel. i'm very excited about the possibility. very excited about how the ag lab can play a major part in that. i think, let's use this area as an example that we can hold up around the rest
environment for businesses or hospitals to grow so that could be more jobs? maffei: there's no question tax reform would be very, very important and if you think we need to lower rates but get rid of a lot of loopholes, particularly corporate loopholes, the ones that ship jobs overseas. cease to exist. ann marie buerkle is voted to continue. she's voted to continue to big tax breaks for oil companies. that's very important. i do think there's changes that need to be made in the affordable care act. i'm opposed to the device attacks. i've worked with well challenged not to in first place. i do think we need to make those changes but we will never making changes if we're not willing to compromise. >> moderator: would repealing affordable care act affect jobs in any way, it positively? the you see it affecting it in a negative way? buerkle: absolutely. this country needs health care reform. transom but you are saying he will repeal it? buerkle: i will repeal it and put in something that will be bipartisan. this is something the democrats sat down shutdown stroke of the of the american people.
would get it on either the environment or, more broadlyon the globe. g >> nonetheless, did the debates matter? do you think they've had an impact on the campaign? >> yes, a what we, what we saw weross the debates is what we expected to see. we saw learning about those issues that weraddressed. more accurate placemenadof candemdates on the areas in whih they differ. whaowe didn't see is more accurate placement on areas that they're similar because the news never stresses areas in which they're similar. but nonethweess, we've seen learning across the debates in our annenberg survey. when t my sense is tha there is no penalty for lying or as jonathan swift says in the last part of "gulliver's", for saying the thing that is not soh that the things one learns about what people say are completely irrelevant. governor romney has chang his position on just about everything throughout his entire career. and that, i believe, bedevils the fact checkers who hall say, "well, his official position is this, but then he did that.wh so it's hard to know, but you can't really say, this is true because a
rags. more blow back earlier but it's a news environment where they feel they can air whatever they want, people will be talk about sandy, ar by trait it after the election. >> this is the obama campaign's response to that ad. take a look at it. >> and now, after romney's false claim of jeep outsourcing to china, chrysler itself has refuted romney's lie. the truth, jeep is adding jobs in ohio. >> well, i mean, so do you have that response. you have -- i just think there are auto workers in ohio that know that their factory doors have remained open because of the choice the president made when he first took office. >> absolutely. i spent time recently in columbus which interestingly is a very bipartisan town, be democratic mayor, a bunch of republican city fathers spent money on infrastructure, supported the auto industry, they have a delegation to china to do deals like this one, to look for ways factory workers in columbus can sell to chinese. i think american workers are savvier about globalization and the opportunity it presents. >> that's not what the obama campaign thinks.
money in this environment. what do you do? is this a buying opportunity? >> not particularly. you have to look at the technical indicators and see where we're going see a breakdown. i would be putting no money to work right new. because of this election, if we see romney elected, we'll see oil prices drop. you'll see energy prices drop. that might be a buying opportunity at that point. other than that, i really believe we have to just take a look and see attitude right now. >> well, one of our guests, a regular on this program, had a great idea. he said to me, maybe for one month the fed instead of putting that $40 billion of mortgage-backed securities buying, put that on hold and send it to some of the ravaged areas like staten island, like new jersey. >> i love it. i absolutely love that idea. >> i do too. >> then the fed's crossing the line into fiscal policy and out of the realm of monetary policy. >> where are we going to get it? >> fema responds rather adroitly to -- katrina notwithstanding, to these disasters. i suspect they're going to be quite responsive right now for those wh
Search Results 150 to 199 of about 844 (some duplicates have been removed)